Prepositions of Movement | Definition, Useful List & Examples

Prepositions of movement are words that describe the movement of objects or people from one place to another. They help us to describe the direction of movement, the starting point, and the destination. Some common prepositions of movement include “to,” “from,” “through,” “into,” and “out of.” Understanding how to use these prepositions correctly can help you to communicate more effectively in English.

Using prepositions of movement correctly is important because it helps to avoid confusion and misunderstandings. For example, if you say “I am going to the store” instead of “I am going into the store,” it could lead to confusion about whether you are entering or simply heading towards the store. By using prepositions of movement correctly, you can make your meaning clear and ensure that you are understood by others.

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Understanding Prepositions of Movement

Prepositions of movement are used to indicate the direction of movement of a person or an object. They are essential in communicating directions and locations. In this section, you will learn about the most common prepositions of movement and how to use them correctly.

To

The preposition “to” is the most common preposition of movement. It is used to describe movement in the direction of something or someone. For example, “I am going to the store” means that you are moving towards the store.

From

The preposition “from” is used to describe movement away from something or someone. For example, “I am coming from the store” means that you are moving away from the store.

Across

The preposition “across” is used to describe movement from one side of an area, surface, or line to the other side. For example, “I drew a line across the paper” means that you drew a line from one side of the paper to the other.

Through

The preposition “through” is used to describe movement from one end of something to the other end. For example, “I walked through the park” means that you walked from one end of the park to the other end.

Over

The preposition “over” is used to describe movement from one side of something to the other side, usually by going up and over it. For example, “I climbed over the fence” means that you went up and over the fence.

Along

The preposition “along” is used to describe movement parallel to something or someone. For example, “I walked along the beach” means that you walked parallel to the beach.

Remember that prepositions of movement are essential in communicating directions and locations. Using them correctly can help you communicate more effectively and avoid confusion.

Prepositions of Movement List

Prepositions of movement show movement from one place to another. There are 9 basic prepositions that pertain to movement:

Prepositions of Movement: To

‘To’ is used when there is a specific destination in mind. The destination can be a number of things:

A place:

  • I’m going to the doctor’s.
  • Can you direct me to the nearest post office?

An event:

  • Are you going to the party?
  • I have never been to a concert.

A person:

  • She came up to me.
  • I go to my father for advice.

A position:

  • The bathroom is to your left.
  • Keep to the left.

Prepositions of Movement: Towards

‘Towards’ is used in the following instances:

When one has movement in a particular direction in mind, rather than simply a destination:

  • He was walking menacingly towards me.

Or to refer to a position, in relation to a direction from the point of view of the speaker:

  • He was sitting with his back towards me.

Prepositions of Movement: Through

‘Through’ refers to the following types of movement:

Within a space, which can be thought of as surrounding, enclosing or around the object:

  • The train went through the tunnel.

Movement across something, i.e. from one side of it to the other:

  • He cut through the gauze.

Prepositions of Movement: Into

‘Into’ refers to the following types of movement:

Movement from the outside to the inside of something that can be imagined as surrounding, enclosing or around the object:

  • He got into the car.

Movement causing something to hit something else:

  • He swerved into the tree.

Prepositions of Movement: Across

‘Across’ is used to describe:

Movement from one end of something to the other:

  • He walked across the road.
  • He strode across the bridge.

Something’s position when it stretches over the surface it is on:

  • There was a barricade across the road.

To describe something’s position when it is at the opposite end from one’s position:

  • We went to the restaurant across the road.

Prepositions of Movement: Over

‘Over’ is used in the following instances:

To describe something’s position when it is above something else:

  • The bottle is in the cabinet over the sink in the kitchen.

To describe something’s position when it covers a surface:

  • A white cloth had been spread over the corpse.

Prepositions of Movement: Along

‘Along’ is used to describe:

Movement in a line:

  • We walked along the river.

The collective position of a group of things that are in a line:

  • He lived in one of the houses along the river.

Prepositions of Movement: In

‘In’ is used in the following instances:

Something’s position in relation to the area or space or place surrounding it:

  • We are going to have our picnic in the park.
  • I left my car in the garage.

To express towards the inside of something:

  • Put the pickle in the cabinet.

Prepositions of Movement: On

‘On’ is used in the following instances:

To describe something’s position in relation to a surface:

  • There was an array of food on the table.

To describe movement in the direction of a surface:

  • The rain falling on the roof kept me from sleeping.

Examples of Prepositions of Movement

Here are some more example sentences showing prepositions of movement in context:

  • We’re going to town on the bus, okay?
  • She walked over to the window.
  • We received another invitation to a wedding this morning.
  • She stood up and walked towards him.
  • She kept glancing towards the phone.
  • I walked backwards towards the door.
  • They walked slowly through the woods.
  • He struggled through the crowd till he reached the front.
  • Let’s go into the garden.
  • Stop running around and get into bed!
  • She walked across the field/road.
  • They’re building a new bridge across the river.
  • Helicopters dropped leaflets over the city.
  • I put a shawl over my shoulders.
  • We walked along the beach collecting small crabs in a bucket.
  • Cars were parked all along the road.
  • Get in the car.
  • She stepped in the batter’s box.
  • Your suitcase is on top of the wardrobe.
  • They live in that old house on the hill.

Mistakes to Avoid with Prepositions of Movement

When it comes to prepositions of movement, there are some common mistakes that people make. Here are a few things to keep in mind to avoid these errors:

1. Using the wrong preposition

One of the most common mistakes is using the wrong preposition. For example, you might say “I walked on the street” instead of “I walked along the street”. Using the wrong preposition can change the meaning of the sentence or make it sound awkward.

2. Confusing “in” and “into”

Another mistake is confusing “in” and “into”. “In” is used to describe a location or position, while “into” is used to describe movement from one place to another. For example, you might say “The cat is in the box” but “The cat jumped into the box”.

3. Forgetting to use a preposition

Sometimes people forget to use a preposition altogether. For example, you might say “I climbed the ladder” instead of “I climbed up the ladder”. Using the correct preposition is important for conveying the intended meaning.

4. Using the wrong form of the preposition

Another mistake is using the wrong form of the preposition. For example, you might say “I walked onto the stage” instead of “I walked on to the stage”. Using the wrong form of the preposition can make the sentence sound awkward or confusing.

By keeping these common mistakes in mind, you can improve your use of prepositions of movement and avoid errors that can impact the clarity and accuracy of your writing or speech.

Practical Exercises for Prepositions of Movement

Now that you have learned about prepositions of movement and their usage, it’s time to put your knowledge into practice. Here are some practical exercises that will help you improve your understanding and usage of prepositions of movement:

Exercise 1: Fill in the Blanks

Complete the following sentences with the correct preposition of movement:

  1. I walked _______ the street to get to the store.
  2. The bird flew _______ the tree and landed on the ground.
  3. We drove _______ the mountain to reach the cabin.
  4. The cat jumped _______ the couch and onto the floor.
  5. She climbed _______ the ladder to reach the roof.

Exercise 2: Match the Sentence to the Picture

Match the following sentences to the corresponding picture:

  1. The dog ran _______ the park.
  2. The boy rode his bike _______ the street.
  3. The cat climbed _______ the tree.
  4. The girl jumped _______ the puddle.
  5. The man walked _______ the bridge.

Exercise 3: Create Your Own Sentences

Create your own sentences using prepositions of movement. Here are some examples to get you started:

  1. The ball rolled _______ the hill and into the pond.
  2. The plane flew _______ the clouds and over the ocean.
  3. The baby crawled _______ the room and under the table.
  4. The hiker climbed _______ the mountain and onto the summit.
  5. The car drove _______ the tunnel and out the other side.

By practicing these exercises, you will become more familiar with prepositions of movement and how to use them correctly in your writing and speech. Keep practicing and soon it will become second nature to you.

Conclusion

Congratulations! You have successfully learned about prepositions of movement. By now, you should be familiar with the most common prepositions used to describe movement and their meanings. Remember, prepositions of movement are used to indicate direction, destination, and the manner in which something moves.

Here are a few key takeaways to keep in mind:

  • Prepositions of movement are used to describe the direction, destination, and manner in which something moves.
  • The most common prepositions of movement include to, from, into, out of, off, on, over, under, and through.
  • Prepositions of movement can be used with a variety of nouns, including places, events, and people.
  • Be mindful of the context in which prepositions of movement are used, as they can have different meanings depending on the situation.

Remember, practice makes perfect! Try using prepositions of movement in your everyday conversations to become more comfortable with them. With time and practice, you’ll be using them like a pro in no time.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some examples of prepositions of movement?

Prepositions of movement describe how something or someone moves from one location to another. Some examples of prepositions of movement include “across,” “around,” “down,” “into,” “onto,” “through,” and “up.”

How do prepositions of movement differ from prepositions of location?

Prepositions of movement describe how something or someone moves from one location to another, while prepositions of location describe the position of something or where something is. For example, “in” is a preposition of location that describes where something is, while “into” is a preposition of movement that describes the action of going from outside to inside.

What is the difference between ‘into’ and ‘in to’ as prepositions of movement?

“Into” is a preposition of movement that describes the action of going from outside to inside, while “in to” is a combination of the preposition “in” and the preposition “to” and is used when “in” and “to” are used separately in a sentence. For example, “I walked into the room” versus “I walked in to see what was happening.”

What are some common mistakes people make when using prepositions of movement?

Some common mistakes people make when using prepositions of movement include using the wrong preposition, using prepositions incorrectly, and forgetting to use prepositions altogether. For example, saying “I walked the park” instead of “I walked through the park” or saying “I jumped the fence” instead of “I jumped over the fence.”

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R M U Ranawera
R M U Ranawera
3 years ago

This is a web Innovation, Excellent , learning Knowledge . Thanksgiving

Verbu Y
Verbu Y
2 years ago

I really love this

Kim Jisoo
Kim Jisoo
2 years ago

I loved the examples 😻😻

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